Increasing Team Engagement in Retrospectives

Team having a fun retrospective

I love retrospectives. They’re one of the easiest and most effective ways of directly implementing an agile principle. (At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behaviour accordingly.) Retrospectives should be something that the team looks forward to because they know that it means that during the next iteration they’re going to improve. Unfortunately, this doesn’t seem to be the case for all the teams I meet. In this post I’ll talk about how you can improve your team’s retrospectives so that they can be excited about them and improve their ways of working. Continue reading “Increasing Team Engagement in Retrospectives”

POWER Start Your Meetings

How many meetings have you been in that you didn’t understand why you or someone else was there? Or perhaps you didn’t know why the meeting was happening or what the meeting was expected to deliver? On average, an hour meeting attended by ten people costs the business £500. Roll this out to a couple of meetings a week, and that team is burning through £4,000. For investment we better be getting a good return. Worse still, if that meeting didn’t come to a solid conclusion and setup another meeting, the cost of delay could be high. An easy to adopt meeting facilitation technique that can help to dramatically increase meeting output, increase ROI, and reduce the cost of delay is a POWER start. Continue reading “POWER Start Your Meetings”

Addressing Team Reliance Upon One

Our team is comprised primarily of relatively new staters, with all but one being here between four months and four weeks. One developer (let’s call him Jack) has been here much longer and is very familiar with the product. As I’m sure we’ve all seen in this scenario the team has developed a level of reliance upon Jack that was understandable to start with, but needs tackling to avoid problems in the future. Continue reading “Addressing Team Reliance Upon One”